From the passionate joy of the winners, “the well-known inertia of the system will soon develop”, prophesied Kickl.

From the passionate joy of the winners, “the well-known inertia of the system will soon develop”, prophesied Kickl. The keys to future liberal success were “work, down-to-earth, honesty and credibility”.

So the FPÖ will “regain its strength” in Vienna in order to be strong for those “who are quickly abandoned by yesterday’s winners”, explained Kickl: “This is how I see our mission. This is how I see my mission . “

FPÖ farmer for discussion in committees

Udo Landbauer wants to discuss the liberal debacle in the Vienna election in the party committees. He will not do anything through the media, said the chairman of the Lower Austrian FPÖ on Monday. However, he hinted that “as a whole, it will not be possible to continue as before”. “This is not going to work.”

Landbauer spoke out in favor of an honest analysis. He described 100,000 former voters in the non-voter camp as “dramatic”, but added that these citizens were at least “not lost”. The task now is to regain trust. Because, according to the Lower Austrian provincial chairman: The FPÖ has “not a substantive hole, but a trust hole” that needs to be plugged.

Federal Party Presidium next week

The FPÖ will only deal with the analysis of the Vienna election at federal level next week. A federal party presidium is planned for the beginning of next week. An exact date has not yet been set, as the party said. In addition, reference was only made to the traditional “blue Monday”.

Personal consequences have so far been excluded. FPÖ boss

Norbert Hofer

saw no need for it on election night. Rather, it is now more important that the party stick together. Also a top candidate

Dominik Nepp

did not think of resigning on election evening, he wanted to analyze the result first.

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In the Vienna election campaign, the ÖVP and FPÖ vie for disappointed people

Strache

-Voters.

Flowers

wants to score with sharpness in matters of integration and immigration – and the FPÖ is drifting even further to the right.

He opened his speech at the start of the election campaign

Dominik Nepp

with a joke he’s been making a lot lately. “We have one of the biggest FPÖ fans, I have to see if he’s there.” Playful looking look at the audience. “I think you all know him, it’s Gernot Blümel.” Laughter. “He recently said that the FPÖ Vienna is right on all issues.someone help me essay I just think he forgot a bit which party he is with.”

Attentive city strollers could also get this impression these days. “Dominik Nepp: Our daham / SPÖ, ÖVP, Greens: Radical Islam”, posters the FPÖ. “Integration for Vienna”, calls for an ÖVP election poster. The speeches with which Nepp and ÖVP top candidate Gernot Blümel opened the hot phase of the election campaign last week sounded suspiciously similar.

While Nepp was cracking his joke on Kardinal-Rauscher-Platz in Vienna’s 15th district, Blümel was standing in the courtyard of the ÖVP party headquarters in the inner-city Lichtenfelsgasse. Election campaign à la Corona with ÖVP sympathizers connected via video call and a speech recorded in the problem district of Favoriten: “You know, we no longer feel at home here. I have heard this sentence very often in the last few weeks when I am in different Grätzeln in Vienna was on the way, “says Blümel. The ABC of right-wing populists follows: home, parallel societies, welcoming culture. He sounds a bit more elegant than ripple. Nevertheless: The current Vienna election campaign is degenerating into a political competition of the unsightly kind, a wrangling on the right edge. Who this is supposed to impress is clear: the roughly 20 percent former FPÖ voters who say in surveys that they no longer want to vote for the Freedom Party on October 11th.

Integration report

The integration report, which was conveniently published at the beginning of the intensive election campaign at the beginning of September, provided the first step forward. And the parties transformed. In political battle rhetoric that has washed up: “We will not leave Vienna to Arabization and Africanization without a fight,” said employees of FPÖ candidate Dominik Nepp in a broadcast. Blümel recognized in the report that it was mandated to deliver “center-right policy with decency” – thus ostensibly the policy of the ÖVP. However: “The center-right claim does not exist in this election campaign,” says political scientist Peter Filzmaier. “You position yourself clearly to the right and accept the risk of losing bourgeois, liberal voters to Neos, Greens and maybe also to the SPÖ, so that the other way round, you win the FPÖ voters. Because you know that the bottom line is most likely After all, you are fighting for more than a hundred thousand FPÖ votes that are on the market. “

Foreign election campaign

Surveys suggest that the Corona issue is currently by far the most interesting of the voters. But there is not much to be done for the right-wing and right-wing Viennese opposition parties: SP Mayor Michael Ludwig is sitting on the Pouvoir, giving out schnitzel vouchers and announcing free vaccinations. A small (or larger) anti-foreigner election campaign, however, always works. At least if the goal is to make profit from the bankruptcy assets of the Ibiza-weakened FPÖ. The turquoise ÖVP is now cheerfully spitting tones that would have put the hair on the back of the neck of an Erhard Busek or other representatives of the once liberal city VP. But the time of principles is long gone, now it’s about principle. And that means: full hardship against (illegal) migration and insufficiently integrated immigrants.

Political scientist Kathrin Stainer-Hämmer is critical of this strategy: “Firstly, Gernot Blümel does not stand for pithy sayings. And secondly, it is difficult in such an election campaign to address the top performers and at the same time the fearful. This campaign is not conclusive for me. Sebastian Kurz usually has success staying with an embassy. Blümel cannot do that in this situation. He should actually put up different posters in the 1st district than in the 10th “

In addition, the right edge is shifting further and further to the right, evoking a tonality that not every bourgeois sympathizer approves of. What the ÖVP demands today – German compulsory for community apartments, for example – would have been tight FPÖ line in the past. “You can see the creeping shift in the limits of what can be said, which the FPÖ has been practicing for years. It goes without saying that an election campaign has to come to a head in order to mobilize. But that one goes to the limit of incitement has to do with that the fight on the right has become stronger, “says Stainer-Hämmerle. The current discussions about the admission of refugees from the Greek disaster camp Moria show that the ÖVP’s radical course for foreigners sometimes goes too far, even for officials. Kurz’s tough line provoked unusually critical reactions: from scrupulous party members as well as on the newspaper boulevard. “The government must show more emotion,” headlined the “Kronen Zeitung”. And the German “Bild” newspaper urged him: “Don’t become a heartless chancellor.” But what are a few suppressed tears in the Christian social camp against the option of improving the devastating result of the 2015 Vienna election? “It is a purely strategic calculation example,” says Filzmaier. “The key question is: Can I lose more through internal party conflicts than I hope the FPÖ will gain? And the answer is broadly: There is more to be won.” Postscript: “A top candidate who is finance minister and the first supporter of the Federal Chancellor can no longer get out of this box. He cannot propagate the opposite in Vienna. That would be on the open media stage: I against myself.”

Even Kurz, says Kathrin Stainer-Hämmerle, cannot help but consistently remain tough. “He now has to decide how far he can stay true to his principles and when it will tip in the direction of social coldness and unsolidary behavior in Europe. With Angela Merkel’s criticism, he loses the statesmanlike. Finding this tipping point is difficult. But in He can no longer get by with the truth, he has to show leadership and stick to his course. “

final destination

The match ÖVP vs. The FPÖ could ultimately be of use to both parties because it mobilizes potential non-voters. And Heinz-Christian Strache? Can only try to keep the voters who decided to remain loyal to him. Because more is not to be won for him, says Filzmaier, the stream of voters from the FPÖ to the Strache team had already taken place last year. The former Vice Chancellor of the Republic is degraded to a marginal figure in this election campaign by neglecting the other parties, a contemplative intermediate or at least the final stop in Strache’s spectacular political vita. “I think the Strache sympathizers themselves do not yet know whether and who they will vote for,” says Stainer-Hämmerle. Or to put it another way: The disenchantment with politics, which Strache owes his rise to, could also mean his ultimate downfall.

This article originally appeared in News Issue No. 38/20

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steff39 Tue., Sep. 29, 2020 12:11 pm

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An ÖVP slogan: “Do you want it to stay the way it is?” YES, YES and YES again! Green? Sure, the environment needs to be protected / repaired. The GREENS should have agreed to Kickl’s horses!

Testor Mon., Sep. 28, 2020 2:41 pm

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The Viennese have several options to choose from: The unsympathetic on the right abyss, Nepp; the even more unsympathetic, arrogant, right-wing Blümel; the extremely unsympathetic HC who fell completely into the right swamp. Who is left outside of this scary trio? The not unsympathetic Dr. Ludwig of the old Vienna party. Anyone else? Brav green and Brav neos?

Page 1 of 1 ”

The government work of the SPÖ was the main motive for almost half of its own voters to vote for the party. This is the result of a study by pollster Peter Hajek. At ÖVP, Greens and NEOS, the core topics of integration, environment and education were decisive for the election. Team HC – and surprisingly also the FPÖ – were largely chosen because of their top candidates.

Among the SPÖ voters, top candidate and mayor Michael Ludwig was only the fifth strongest motive with 9 percent after “good work done” (46 percent), “regular voters” (21 percent), “social policy” (15 percent) and “election program” (10 percent).

Also interesting:

All information and projections for the Vienna election in the live blog

SPÖ with workers and apprentices ahead

The Viennese SPÖ has again become the strongest party among workers. 37 percent voted for the mayor’s party, as the election day survey by the SORA Institute for ORF shows. The FPÖ only came to 26 percent (2015 it was 53). And the Strache team achieved its best result among workers with 19 percent.

The SPÖ was also the strongest party on Sunday among employees (37 percent) as well as public servants and pensioners (53 percent each). Only with the self-employed the Social Democrats had to admit defeat with 26 to 30 percent of the ÖVP. The NEOS came here to 13 percent. The Greens reached 18 percent of the salaried and self-employed, but only five percent of the retirees.

In addition, the SPÖ was the strongest party in all educational groups on Sunday. The apprentices – 44 percent blue in 2015 – this time 49 percent voted red. In terms of academics, the SPÖ was also ahead with 33 percent, followed by the Greens with 25 percent. Among the graduates, the ÖVP (24 percent) came second behind the SPÖ (37 percent).

Nepp and “least evil” motive for FPÖ voters

The FPÖ voted for more than a fifth (22 percent) because of their top candidate Dominik Nepp. For 19 percent of the Freedom voters it was a “least evil” election. Only then does the free core issue of “immigration policy” follow (17 percent).

© APA

Greens moved because of “environmental policy”

The main theme of the Green “environmental policy” was the decisive motive for 44 percent of their voters. This is followed by the reasons “election program” (20 percent) and transport policy (13 percent).

ÖVP and NEOS convinced with their election program

For 29 percent of ÖVP voters and 43 percent of NEOS voters, the respective election program was the main reason. The HC Strache team voted 59 percent because of their top candidate of the same name.

Why not chosen? SPÖ because of Rendi-Wagner

For the representative study 2,000 people were interviewed by phone or online. The pollsters asked not only the voting motives, but also the non-voting motives. Voters were surveyed who voted for a different party in the 2020 Vienna municipal council election than in the 2019 National Council election in Vienna. The SPÖ was therefore not elected by 7 percent of its NR voters because of the federal party leader Pamela Rendi-Wagner. 12 percent did not vote for the SPÖ to strengthen the Greens.

FPÖ lost voters because of scandals, Grün because of Hebein

Their ex-voters decided against the FPÖ because of the “FPÖ scandals” (19 percent) or to support Heinz-Christian Strache (17 percent). After all, 12 percent of the Green voters in the National Council election did not vote for the Greens this time because of the top candidate Birgit Hebein. Even with former ÖVP and NEOS voters, the top candidates Gernot Blümel (21 percent) and Christoph Wiederkehr (17 percent) were decisive in not voting for the party this year. The non-voters stayed at home mainly for reasons of disaffection with politics (38 percent) and “for health reasons” (24 percent).